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[Week 2] Slightly ahead, slightly not! Preparing milestone!

http://youtu.be/QONNn1f8TxU

Here’s a video of my work so far. I’ve done a very simple particle engine, capable of taking a “gravity” force, an initial impulse of and position of a particle in time. Everything so far is calculated only on the GPU, apart from the original values. I intend to add functionality to it under the upcoming weeks, as well as start working on some more proper visualisations. There is only one thing I’m behind on, and that is spawning the particles on different times! My solution to this will be to spawn the unused particles under the world until they have passed their first ‘particle death’, where they’ll be moved back in the particle simulation. This is everything that is stopping me from having a particle visualisation that isn’t.. very.. pattern-like?

It’s running 11.2 million particles on the GPU at once in real time. Initial transfer requires three float4 arrays to the GPU (as VBOs). How much is that to transfer? 16 * 11200000 *3  / (1024^2)  = (roughly) 512 MB of data. I think? At around 170 MB of data, only the position information by itself would be nasty to send back and forth between the CPU and the GPU all of the time. Especially considering we want to update the particle field in real time. Thirty or more times per second is desireable, and at this point in time, sending data back and forth from the CPU to the GPU would just be a major bottleneck. Which is why altering the VBO directly on the GPU is so handy.

 

I never thought I would say it; but it would seem I’m one step ahead of my planning. I was very lenient with my time scheduling, and I had been rather paranoid about the troubles of drawing on the GPU. As drawing on the GPU turned out surprisingly simple. I have wasted a lot of time being sick and bothered, so I got less done than I had imagined, but actually sending a vbo to openCL was really easy, especially with the khronos c++ opencl bindings. That was work meant for next week.

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